Fire Safety

stop-drop-rollFire safety education is the most important job that we have as firefighters. Fire prevention is the most important job you have. The first step in surviving a fire is to prevent it from happening. More people die in fires every year than in earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, and all other natural disasters combined! Please take the time with your kids and teach them not to play with fire.

We also need to teach them what to do if a fire does happen like “Stop, Drop, and Roll”, how to use 911 to call for help, etc. Nearly 100,000 fires are started every year by kids, start teaching them about fire safety early! There are some excellent links on the buttons on the left that will help you teach them while keeping them interested at the same time. You can also use your favorite search engine and type in “Fire Prevention for Kids” and find many more sites to assist your family.

As an adult, you also have a responsibility to make sure that your home is safe. Do routine checks on electrical items, make sure that your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors are working properly, have working batteries in them, and that you test your detectors every month and change your batteries twice per year.

Learn more about when to Stop, Drop and Roll at the National Fire Protection Association

Fire Safety for Kids

Help keep kids Fire Wise and Fire Safe

Click on the links below where you and your children can learn more about Fire Safety:

Sparky the Fire Dog

The Sparky website is a great activity website that’s very interactive for children. Children can learn what to do in case of a fire and discover more about the tools firefighters use. http://www.sparky.org/

Smokey The Bear

Learn about Smokey the Bear, his journey and keep track of current wildfires that are burning.  http://www.smokeybear.com/

McGruff

McGruff, The Crime Dog, has his own interactive website for children. McGruff educates children in how to handle and report bullying, home safety and many other topics parents will find useful. http://www.mcgruff.org/